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March 13, 2007

I usually try to place my bird feeders in the garden, depending on what kind of seed they contain. I am down to only three kinds of feed lately.

I like whole unshelled peanuts for the woodpeckers and chickadees. I have a metal peanut feeder which works great. But I also use some onion netting as well. I saved a couple of netting bags from the small white onions or from a garlic netting bag. I put the peanuts in the netting, tie up the end and hang the bag in a tree or bush. It does bother me when the small downy woodpecker laboriously pecks a hole in the peanut shells, only to be chased away by the bully bluejays once the peanuts are accessible.

I keep the feeder for the niger thistle in a spot that hangs over a lawn area. Last year, the seed sprouted in a pathway/garden area and I had to keep pulling the thistle out. In the lawn, they won’t grow to any height once the lawn mower starts its regular rounds.

Black sunflower seeds seem to disappear overnight. When the birds are ravenous, I could be filling the feeders every other day and still not keep up. The goldfinches, sparrows, purple finches, chickadees, blue jays, cardinals and mourning doves all flock to the feeders. I don’t mind if these feeders are situated over certain garden beds. In those beds, I don’t mind if a few sunflowers sprout up later in the spring.

In fact, I usually save some of the sunflower seed to sow in the garden. A handful of bird seed bought at bird seed prices costs only pennies. A package of sunflower seeds costs a couple of dollars at a minimum. If I feel extravagant I will splurge on a couple of packages of the fancy sunflowers, but for a mass planting, the bird seed variety is good enough for me (and the birds that do come along late in the summer to feed on the seed).

 

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March 12, 2007

My youngest son is insistent that Christmas isn’t Christmas without a real Christmas tree. That’s fine since he will take it upon himself to choose the tree, bring it home and even set it up and decorate it.

Once the tree has served its purpose for the holiday season, I’ll take it outside somewhere and use it as a landing spot for a bird feeder. By March, it is usually starting to turn brown, but at least it’s gotten an extra three months of use. After that, I’ll take it into the edge of the woods (more like overgrown brush, etc) along the fence line to let it serve another few months as cover for the rabbits and other wildlife that tend to inhabit the edges of the hayfield.

I’m not sure, though, if I should encourage the rabbits. My poor dwarf burning bush (Euonymus alata compacta) has always been a dwarf. In ten years, it has never grown past the 2 ft. high mark. Every summer it manages to get a little higher, only to be chewed back each winter by the rabbits. I’m sure that burning bush is their favourite winter snack. They do munch on some of my regular evergreen euonymus and spireas but they usually don’t mind the trimming.

This winter the willows have bent over due to the ice storm earlier this year. The rabbits have been nibbling on the bark. Willows - I don’t mind if they want willows. I cut some willows down to the ground about four years ago and those willows by the end of last summer they were over thirty feet high.

 

 

 

If you have a lawn/tree/shrub that needs some Tender Loving Care - get The KING OF GREEN:

 

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Soil is more than "Dirt". All plants will grow better in good soil. So. . . what makes soil good? Different plants have different tolerances to soil conditions.


Lawns need a soil with good structure. This refers to the size and shape of the soil particles. Ideally, about fifty percent of the soil should be soil solids. The rest of the soil is composed of the empty spaces called pores spaces. Basically there are two types of pores. The small pores are important for storing water. These small pores contain the water and allow it to move in the soil through capillary action. The smaller the pores, the higher up (the greater distance) the water is able to move. Large pores are essential for drainage and aeration. These pores are too large to hold water (at least for very long) but they are important because they hold oxygen. Without the correct balance of water and air, the roots will not survive.

Clay soils are fine textured and have the largest amount of pore space. However, because the pores are small, they tend to hold less oxygen and can contain a lot of moisture. Sandy soils on the other hand, have large pores, thereby limiting the amount of water that the soil can hold.

The best soil will have a balance of fine-textured silts and clays, with some coarser textured soil solids to allow water to drain away after a rain or irrigation.

 

If you have a lawn/tree/shrub that needs some Tender Loving Care - get The KING OF GREEN:

 

Turf King Home

 

Click here to Request a Quote Online -

 

or call us at 905.318.6677 or 1.888.TURFKING (887.3546)

 

If you would like more information, please Contact us

 

Follow us on Twitter  http://twitter.com/turfkingofgreen

 

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Copyright 2007 Turf King-Hamilton. All Rights Reserved.

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