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Grass seed:  We are looking at a new grass seed supplier. We were discussing the different mixes. We wanted to make sure that the new mix included some endophytic perennial rye grass seed.

What does "endophytic" mean for the lawn? Endophytic grasses reduce the presence of chinch bugs and other lawn pests. They contain materials that are either toxic to the insects or that cause the pests to avoid these plants. Perennial rye grasses have been developed to reduce the chances of insect damage. Never use endophytic lawn grasses in pasture areas as the endophytic grasses are harmful to horse and cattle. Our mix uses a "turf-type" perennial rye grass. This designation is to distinguish between fine textured varieties that are suitable for lawn use from those varieties that have coarse, unsightly leaf blades.

Mixes with annual rye grass are generally not recommended. The annual rye grass is useful in some situations as it germinates rapidly. However, it is not long-lived. Generally, turf-type perennial rye grasses will do the same job of germinating quickly, thus providing some cover and protection for the slower germinating grasses such as Kentucky bluegrass.

 

If you have a lawn/tree/shrub that needs some Tender Loving Care - get The KING OF GREEN:

 

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or call us at 905.318.6677 or 1.888.TURFKING (887.3546)

 

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Driving through town last week, I was surprised at how many lawns one finds here and there with damage from the summer. Some may be from the hot, dry summer. Some may have been from chinch bug damage. Hard to tell at this point in time.

Can anything be done in the middle of November? Sod may still be available so the lawn could be repaired. I would first suggest checking the lawn for grubs. These two pictured lawns don't look like grub problems, but, it is worthwhile checking. If there are grubs and you sod over them, the grubs aren't likely to do too much damage to the sod. Raccoons and skunks, however, may think, "hey these grubs are easy to find, and the grass was really easy to lift up!"

If you're not in the mood to sod right now, I would suggest waiting until spring to do any seeding. It is unlikely that grass seed will do too much at this time of year.

If it makes you feel better, you could purchase a small amount of grass seed and throw it over the bare spots. It may come up next spring and it may not. A little bit of grass seed is a relatively inexpensive way to salve your conscience. The only problem is that when the ideal time to seed and repair comes around next spring, the grass seed you throw down now won't have come up so you will have to start all over again from scratch.

So, I guess the only reason to put some grass seed down now is if you are the type that only has a 50-50 chance of getting around to doing any repairs and seeding at the correct time next spring.

 

 

If you have a lawn/tree/shrub that needs some Tender Loving Care - get The KING OF GREEN:

 

 

 

or call us at 905.318.6677 or 1.888.TURFKING (887.3546)

 

If you would like more information, please Contact us

 

Follow us on Twitter  http://twitter.com/turfkingofgreen

 

Join our Facebook page  

 

Copyright 2007 Turf King-Hamilton. All Rights Reserved.

 

Is the autumn season called "fall" because of the leaves? Fall does mean leaves will fall. And leaves fallen on a lawn shouldn't leave the lawn in worse shape than it would be if  the leaves aren't left on the lawn. Whew!

Once the leaves end up on the lawn, they should be removed. Large flat leaves like those from maples, can easily lie on the lawn and smother the grass. When you do rake them into leaf piles, don't leave the piles sitting on the lawn too long. I have come to lawns in the spring where you could see the leaves piled in several places in the melting snow. Inevitably the lawn under those leaf piles has died from the lack of light and air.

If the leaf drop is not too severe, you may be lucky enough to run the lawn mower over the leaves and chop them up fine enough to allow them to compost right on the lawn. If that's not an option,
you can use your mower and lawn mower bag to gather the leaves.

If you do need to rake, make sure to use a leaf rake to rake leaves. The tines of leaf rakes are flexible enough that they will not damage the lawn.

Once you have the leaves all gathered together, why not compost them?
Fall leaves are a valuable resource because they keep garden soil productive and allow these nutrients to be recycled back into your garden.

 

If you have a lawn/tree/shrub that needs some Tender Loving Care - get The KING OF GREEN:

 

Turf King Home

 

Click here to Request a Quote Online -

 

or call us at 905.318.6677 or 1.888.TURFKING (887.3546)

 

If you would like more information, please Contact us

 

Follow us on Twitter  http://twitter.com/turfkingofgreen

 

Join our Facebook page  

 

http://www.bit.ly/FacebookTK

 

 

 

www.lawncarehamilton.com

 

www.lawncarehaldimand.com

 

www.lawncarewaterdown.com

 

www.lawncaregrimbsy.com

 

 

 

Copyright 2007 Turf King-Hamilton. All Rights Reserved.

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